Saturday, February 12, 2011

Tunes

It's difficult for me to write entries about music because I always try too hard to sound like I know what I am talking about and inevitably reread the post and punch myself in the face. So in the interest of avoiding a black eye I will write about a few of my favorite songs at the moment and explain why I like them and when I listen to them. Simple as that.

5. Creeper by Islands



Why I like it:

It's called "Creeper."
The guitar riff manages to be lazy and sexy at the same time.
The band is Canadian and my six month anniversary with Canada is coming up in a few weeks.

When I listen to it:

When I'm creeping on Facebook
When I'm creeping at a club
When I'm in Canada

4. The Bleeding Heart Show by The New Pornographers



Why I like it:

Boy + girl vocals are soothing and wonderful. Sounds like my friends are singing to me.
When the chorus kicks into "we quit the room", the whole song changes.
When the vocals change into guitar and "helas, helas!", the whole song changes.
It keeps me guessing as to what the bleeding heart show really is and why they've arrived too late for it.

When I listen to it:

Anytime, all the time, everytime

3. Fuck You by Cee Lo Green



Why I like it:

It's satisfying and raw and naughty to sing, "Fuck you, fuck fuck you!"
It's a different cut from the kind of indie music I usually enjoy.
It makes people happy when it comes on.
Everyone can relate to it.

When I listen to it:

When I'm in the shower
When my cat jumps off my lap, abandoning me forever

2. Crave You by Flight Facilities



Why I like it:

A boy I once liked showed it to me.

When I listen to it:

When I think about that boy.

1.) John Wayne Gacy, Jr. by Sufjan Stevens



Why I like it:

It's about somebody who was really messed up. The lyrics capture some of the significant events in that person's life, like when he suffered a head injury as a child and when he dressed up as a clown and made kids laugh. But they don't glorify him or make him seem more complex or anything.
Sufjan's guitar, piano, and vocals are beautiful.
It is tangentially related to Chicago.
The narrator compares himself to John Wayne Gacy, Jr. That sort of parallel is shocking and reassuring at the same time because you want to view someone like JWGJ as a monster - how could he have done the things he did? - and put yourself as far away from as possible from someone from him. But Sufjan points out that everyone has floorboards - everyone has things they suppress from the world in an effort to appear normal and happy and well-adjusted, and even someone as fucked up as John Wayne Gacy, Jr could get away with what he did for as long as he did because he could put on a damn good show otherwise, the way we all do. I love the line, "and on my best behavior/I am really just like him/look beneath the floorboards/for the secrets I have hid."

When I listen to it:

Before I fall asleep every night, as it has earned a slot in my sleep playlist. Is that a bad thing, that I listen to a song about a serial killer at the end of each day? Then again, I like to think JWGJ would've listened to something totally bizarre-o and/or ridiculous before bed, like something by The Flaming Lips or Ke$ha. So I don't think that makes me exhibit serial killer tendencies, which is always a reassuring and positive note on which to end a blog entry.

1 comment:

  1. i first listened to JWG Jr. when I was super stoned and it made me really really sad but yeah it's a good song

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